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Publications - 2TS - Work Instructions
Work instruction 18: Teeth clipping/grinding
Thursday, 9 February 2012
Piglets are born with a pair of needle-sharp milk teeth at each of the front four corners of their jaws. In some circumstances these teeth can damage the sow's teats when suckling and make them tender so that she may refuse to suckle her piglets. They can
sometimes also inflict savage facial wounds on their litter mates leading to infection.
Teeth clipping (210.11KB)
Work instruction 17: Tail docking
Monday, 6 February 2012
For a variety of reasons pigs may bite each other's tails. This can lead to infection, abscesses in the spine, severe pain, lameness and carcase condemnation. Where other management options have proven ineffective, your veterinary surgeon may recommend tail docking as a method to help prevent tail biting.
Work Instruction 17. Tail docking (182.76KB)
Work instruction 16: Split Suckling
Friday, 25 March 2011
Split suckling is a technique which can be used to help provide enough colostrum to all piglets within a large litter.
Work Instruction 16. Split Suckling (180.78KB)
Work instruction 15: Skip-a-heat
Tuesday, 3 August 2010
Skip-a-heat is a practice that is most commonly used in first parity sows to avoid a second litter performance drop; it can however be adapted and used for older sows. Skipping a heat will increase the farms number of non-productive days, but there appears to be a payback in terms of improved performance and longevity of the sow.
Work instruction 15 Skip-a-heat (186.22KB)
Work instruction 14: Humanising gilts and young boars
Tuesday, 3 August 2010
Humans are part of the pigs environment and humanising gilts pre-puberty is an essential part of ensuring they are productive and easy to manage throughout their life. Humanising gilts makes the handling and moving process easier for both the gilt
and the stockperson.
Work instruction 14 Humanising gilts and young boars (248.70KB)
Work instruction 13: Handling gilts
Tuesday, 3 August 2010
Depending on your policy for humanisation of gilts (see Work Instruction 14) they can have varied levels of trepidation when being handled and managed for the first cycle.
This can start from stimulating all the way through to their first weaning as the surroundings and interactions will be new.
It is important to always think of a gilt as a special case and have that in the front of your mind when handling them.
Work instruction 13 Handling gilts (331.23KB)
Work Instruction 11: Tagging animals for identification (Polish)
Thursday, 2 April 2009
Work Instruction 11: Tagging animals for identification (Polish)
Work Instruction 11 Tagging animals for identification Polish (267.27KB)
Work Instruction 10: Shunt fostering (outdoors) on a 3-week batch system (Polish)
Thursday, 2 April 2009
Work Instruction 10: Shunt fostering (outdoors) on a 3-week batch system (Polish)
Work Instruction 10 Shunt fostering outdoors on a 3-week batch system Polish (240.27KB)
Work Instruction 9: Preparing a farrowing arc (Polish)
Thursday, 2 April 2009
Work Instruction 9: Preparing a farrowing arc (Polish)
Work Instruction 9 Preparing a farrowing arc Polish (288.46KB)
Work Instruction 7: Loading and unloadling pigs (Polish)
Thursday, 2 April 2009
Work Instruction 7: Loading and unloadling pigs (Polish)
Work Instruction 7 Loading and unloadling pigs Polish (302.53KB)
Work Instruction 6: Semen storage and handling (Polish)
Thursday, 2 April 2009
Work Instruction 6: Semen storage and handling (Polish)
Work Instruction 6 Semen storage and handling Polish (159.82KB)
Work Instruction 5: Pressure washing (Polish)
Thursday, 2 April 2009
Work Instruction 5: Pressure washing (Polish)
Work Instruction 5 Pressure washing Polish (292.19KB)
Work Instruction 4: Safe storage of veterinary medicines (Polish)
Thursday, 2 April 2009
Work Instruction 4: Safe storage of veterinary medicines (Polish)
Work Instruction 4 Safe storage of veterinary medicines Polish (220.24KB)
Work Instruction 3. Preparing the farrowing crate (Polish)
Thursday, 2 April 2009
Work Instruction 3. Preparing the farrowing crate(Polish)
Work Instruction 3. Preparing the farrowing crate Polish (242.48KB)
Work Instruction 12: Litter swapping
Wednesday, 19 November 2008
Swapping whole litters will reduce the stress normally experienced by the piglets from being moved and mixed with a group of new litter mates, whilst providing the weaker piglets the opportunity to recover through improved milk intake.
Work Instruction 12 Litter swapping (227.84KB)
Work Instruction 12 Litter swapping (1.11MB)
Work Instruction 11: Tagging
Wednesday, 12 November 2008
Tagging all animals within the breeding herd (gilts, sows, boars and V boars) enables easy identification. Clear identification is necessary to ensure correct mating protocols, accurate recording and monitoring of individual performance records and for stock checks. Having individual identification provides accurate information for culling and the medicines book.
Work Instruction 11 Tagging (1.96MB)
Work Instruction 11 Tagging (192.52KB)
Work Instruction 10: Shunt fostering (outdoors)
Friday, 7 November 2008
This is carried out to provide extra suckling capacity when born alive is higher than the number of functioning teats in that batch. This process can be referred to as shunt, cascade or 2-stage fostering.
Work Instruction 10 Shunt fostering (234.02KB)
Work Instruction 10 Shunt fostering (3.60MB)
Work Instruction 9: Preparing a farrowing arc
Wednesday, 3 September 2008
Providing the correct environment for both sows and piglets in the farrowing arc will help to minimise mortality and maximise growth rate of piglets and maintain the sow in good condition ready for the next cycle. A well prepared and organised farrowing paddock will make your role easier and more productive.
Work instruction 9 Preparing a farrowing arc (1.48MB)
Work instruction 9 Preparing a farrowing arc (219.31KB)
Work Instruction 8: Handling and restraining pigs
Wednesday, 3 September 2008
All stockmen that handle and restrain pigs should be shown the correct techniques relevant for the size/age of the pig. Correct handling and restraining a pig will reduce the risk of injury and stress to both the pig and stockman.
Work instruction 8 Handling and restraining pigs (142.81KB)
Work instruction 8 Handling and restraining pigs (139.50KB)
Work Instruction 7: Loading and unloading pigs
Monday, 11 August 2008
Loading and unloading can be the most stressful part of the journey for pigs. Handling and moving animals appropriately will make the process easier, minimise stress levels for pigs and stockman and reduce the risk of injury.
Work instruction 7 Loading and unloading (2.58MB)
Work instruction 7 Loading and unloading (158.55KB)
Work Instruction 6: Semen storage and handling
Thursday, 31 July 2008
Semen should be stored at a constant temperature of 17C +/- 2C to maintain semen viability and maximise shelf life. Semen is extremely temperature sensitive: shelf life is shortened at temperatures above 20C; while temperatures below 15C are likely to reduce sperm viability. Semen doses should always be treated carefully to prevent damage from rough handling and protected from exposure to light.
This document is prepared for information purposes only. No responsibility is taken by BPEX Ltd for any inaccuracies or omissions it may contain.
Storing and handling semen correctly at all times will help to improve reproductive performance.
Work Instruction 6 Semen storage and handling (148.30KB)
Work Instruction 6 Semen storage and handling (66.50KB)
Work Instruction 5: Powerwashing
Thursday, 31 July 2008
A consistently high standard of cleaning and disinfection (C&D) is an effective way to break the on-farm cycle of re-infection with infectious diseases. Using a pressure washer reduces water usage and enables efficient and effective cleaning of buildings and equipment, especially when combined with other cleaning products, such as detergent or disinfectant
solutions.
Work Instruction 5 Powerwashing (1.76MB)
Work Instruction 5 Powerwashing (514.22KB)
Work instruction 4: Safe Storage of Veterinary Medicines
Tuesday, 20 May 2008
All prescribed medicines kept on farm should be stored safely. The correct storage of medicines will maintain their effectiveness, reduce treatment errors and protect the health of staff and animals on the unit.
Work instruction 4 Safe Storage of Veterinary Medicines (1.34MB)
Work instruction 4 Safe Storage of Veterinary Medicines (148.88KB)
Work Instruction 3: Preparing the Farrowing Crate
Tuesday, 20 May 2008
Providing the correct environment for both sows and piglets in the farrowing house will help to minimise mortality and maximise growth rate of the piglets and maintain the sow in good condition for the next cycle. A well prepared and organised farrowing room will make your role easier and more productive.
Work instruction 3 Preparing a farrowing crate (1.86MB)
Work instruction 3 Preparing a farrowing crate (198.25KB)
Work Instruction 2: Slapmarking slaughter pigs
Tuesday, 20 May 2008
All pigs must be clearly slapmarked, with the DEFRA herd mark. The slapmarking can take place at a suitable stage in the production system, but must take place before the pigs are loaded. The slapmark must be legible before and after slaughter. The slapmark allows clear identification of pigs and carcases at slaughter and so provide traceability. It is the responsibility of the pig keeper to ensure that every pig being dispatched for slaughter has been clearly and correctly slapmarked.
Work Instruction 2 Slapmarking slaughter pigs (169.16KB)
Work Instruction 1: Writing an effective work instruction
Tuesday, 20 May 2008
While general principles are the same, nearly every farm is different, therefore each unit needs tailored work instructions. A work instruction clearly states what should be done for a specific task, how and when this should be completed and the responsibilities and standards expected of the staff.
Work Instruction 1 Writing an effective work instruction (1.04MB)
Work Instruction 1 Writing an effective work instruction (280.32KB)